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Planning Permission | Adding an extension to your house

House extension

 

If you want to add a house extension in Scotland, you should check first if you need to apply for planning permission.

Permitted development

You do not need to apply for planning permission if the extension meets certain criteria. This is called ‘permitted development’.

The rules for a permitted development will depend on how many storeys that your extension will have added.

Single-storey extensions

Single storey house extension

Single storey house extension

When you are building a new living space on your home and If your extension will have one storey, you don’t need planning permission as long as:

  • It’s situated at the back of your house
  • It wont go back further than three metres if it’s a terraced house, or four metres if it isn’t
  • The height of the eaves is no higher than three metres
  • It’s not higher than four metres, including any sloping roofs
  • It doesn’t have more floor area than your existing house does
  • It doesn’t take up half the ‘*curtilage‘ – (see below) – this is the area behind your house
  • It is not in a conservation area

Single-storey extensions are the most popular type of project. Permitted development rights allow the extension of a house by a single storey extension. The permitted development rights allow alterations to the roof required for the purpose of the augmentation.

The effect of the limitations is that:

  • Extensions are generally situated to the rear of the property
  • If the extension is on, or within one metre of the boundary, it cannot project, from the rear of the existing house, by more than three metres on a  terraced house, or four metres in all other properties
  • The maximum height of the eaves is three metres
  • The height of the extension is not higher than four metres

The footprint of the extension is no larger than the original house or covering more than half the *curtilage

Multi-storey extensions

Multi storey house extension

Two storey house extension

If your extension will have more than one storey, you don’t need planning permission for it as long as:

  • It’s situated at the back of your house
  • There’s at least ten metres between the extension and the boundaries of your ground area
  • It is not higher than your house (this excludes chimneys)
  • It does not cover more floor area than your original house
  • It does not take up half the ‘*curtilage
  • It is not in a conservation area

You should always double check with your council’s planning department to check whether you need to apply for planning permission at all. There may be other approvals you’ll need to get.

Planning permission

If the house extension you want to build does not meet with the conditions for permitted development, you will have to apply for planning permission for your project.

Multi storey house extension

Do I need planning permission?

If you want to carry out building work you may need planning permission. You should always check with your planning authority whether you need to apply for planning permission for building work on your property.

(The following information is for guidance only)

Your project will need planning permission if:

  • You want to make a major change to your building like building an extension
  • You want to change the use of your property
  • Your building is in a conservation area
  • Your building is listed

When a planning application is not needed

Small building projects that don’t make an impingement on the surrounding area might not need to have a planning application. (This is called permitted development)

Permitted development are rights that are granted so that many instances of small alterations and extensions can be built without needing to apply for planning permission.

Other approvals

It is possible that you might need other approvals for your home extension before you can start building work. e.g. you might need approval of the building regulations from your local council. If you don’t own the land on which the project is being carried out you may need to get the landowner’s permission. It is your obligation to ensure that you get any mandatory approval.

*Curtilage

In law, the curtilage of a house is the land surrounding it, including any close buildings and structures, but excluding any associated “open fields beyond”, and also excluding any closely associated buildings, structures that contain the separate activities of their own occupants with those occupying residents being people other than those residents of the house of which the building is associated.

Visit CGH Home Extensions